Wytheville, VA

Wytheville is a true original, not just because it’s the only town in the country fortunate enough to bear that name but also because of its stunning landscape, which includes majestic mountains, sparkling waters, and rolling hills. No doubt about it – a trip to this memorable and striking town in Southwest Virginia always leaves visitors wanting more!

Historic Sites in Wytheville

Wythe County was created in 1789 and named for George Wythe, the “father of American Jurisprudence” and signer of the Declaration of Independence. In May 1790, Chris Simmerman donated 90 acres, along with John Davis’s 10 acres, to establish a town and county seat. Robert Adams completed a town survey in November of that year, dividing the area into half-acre lots. The town did not have an official name yet but was generally known as Wythe Court House.

Two years later, in October 1792, the town was officially named Evansham, for prominent local citizen Jesse Evans. After a disastrous fire in March 1839, the town was renamed Wytheville. At that time, it was home to about 500 residents.

Proud of its remarkable heritage, Wytheville has preserved much of it and features several museums, including The Wytheville Training School Cultural Center, the region’s only African American Heritage Museum.

Edith Bolling Wilson Birthplace Museum
Address: 145 E. Main Street
Wytheville, VA 24382
Phone: 276-223-3484

Come visit the birthplace and childhood home of First Lady Edith Bolling Wilson. Born and raised in Wytheville, Edith Bolling Wilson is a descendant of Pocahontas and the only Appalachian-born First Lady. As one of only eight historic sites across the country dedicated to the interpretation of a First Lady, the museum tells the story of the overlooked, yet vitally important role Edith Bolling Wilson played in the White House at a pivotal moment during World War I.

Hours M-F: Closed Mondays Tues-Thurs April-Oct 10AM-4PM
Hours Sat-Sun: Sat April-Oct 10AM-2PM